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Home » What's New » Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Conjunctivitis, also called pink eye, is one of the most frequently seen eye diseases, especially in kids. It can be caused by viruses, bacteria or even allergies to pollen, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics, or other irritants, which touch the eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis might be quite transmittable and quickly spread in school and at the office.

Conjunctivitis is seen when the conjunctiva, or thin transparent layer of tissue covering the white part of the eye, becomes inflamed. You can identify conjunctivitis if you notice eye redness, discharge, itching or swollen eyelids and a crusty discharge surrounding the eyes early in the day. Pink eye infections can be divided into three main types: viral, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis.

The viral type is usually a result of a similar virus to that which produces the recognizable red, watery eyes, sore throat and runny nose of the common cold. The red, itchy, watery eyes caused by viral pink eye are likely to last from a week to two and then will clear up on their own. You may however, be able to reduce some of the discomfort by using soothing drops or compresses. Viral pink eye is transmittable until it is completely cleared up, so in the meantime maintain excellent hygiene, remove eye discharge and try to avoid using communal pillowcases or towels. If your son or daughter has viral conjunctivitis, he or she will have to be kept home from school for three days to a week until symptoms disappear.

A bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or cream. One should notice an improvement within just a few days of antibiotic drops, but be sure to adhere to the full prescription dosage to prevent pink eye from recurring.

Allergic pink eye is not contagious. It is usually a result of a known allergy such as hay fever or pet allergies that sets off an allergic reaction in their eyes. First of all, to treat allergic pink eye, you should eliminate the irritant. Use cool compresses and artificial tears to relieve discomfort in mild cases. When the infection is more severe, your eye doctor might prescribe a medication such as an anti-inflammatory or antihistamine. In cases of chronic allergic pink eye, topical steroid eye drops could be used.

Pink eye should always be diagnosed by a qualified eye doctor in order to identify the type and best course of treatment. Never treat yourself! Keep in mind the sooner you begin treatment, the lower chance you have of giving pink eye to loved ones or prolonging your discomfort.

 

COVID-19 Updates

Dear Valued Patients,

We have missed you and are excited to reopen on Wednesday May 27th, 2020! We are following CDC and American Optometric guidelines on reopening. This has been a very difficult and stressful time for all and we appreciate your patience and understanding.

We will have limited hours of operation for now.

Our new schedule for the near future will be: Mondays 11-5, Wednesdays 11-5, and Saturdays 11-2.

Patients will be seen on an appointment-only basis for the time being.

We are implementing the strict protocol in the office to keep you and our staff safe.

▪  Our doctor & staff will wear face masks & will actively disinfect every room between patients.

▪  Anyone entering the office will be required to wear a facemask and use hand sanitizer upon entry (facemasks with valves are NOT allowed unless another mask is worn on top of it as they do not follow CDC guidelines). We CANNOT make any exceptions at this time and do not accept any waivers. This is to protect our staff, patients and our families.

▪  Appointment times are spaced further apart to ensure social distancing.

▪  No walk-ins will be allowed at this time.

▪  All patients will be required to have the OPTOMAP (Retinal Photography) at a reduced rate to minimize patient contact.

▪  All patients will be required to download, fill out, and bring the intake forms found on the website http://www.eyecareofaustin.com under Patient History form section.

▪  All payments and copayments will be taken over the phone prior to appointments.

▪  Doctor will have video or phone interview about reasons for visits and symptoms, as well as COVID-19 screening questions prior to appointment. We will send you a link for a video chat. This will reduce the time spent in the office and allow face to face conversation before your appointment.

▪  All patients will be required to sign a document stating the following: You have not been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19, have traveled recently, or are feeling feverish.

▪  We will be screening all patients for COVID-19 symptoms. Anyone exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19 has traveled recently or feeling feverish, will be rescheduled at least 14 days out.

▪  Please come to your appointment alone unless you are a minor and require adult supervision or require medical assistance. We will allow one caregiver inside with each patient if necessary.

▪  All instruments will be thoroughly sanitized between each patient.

▪  Discussions with doctor and staff will be kept to a minimum. Follow up phone calls or telehealth

video conferencing will be used as often as possible.

▪  Intensive staff training to ensure a safe, clean, and healthy environment for all of our patients and staff has been implemented.

▪  We will be contacting patients who are currently on the schedule to confirm dates and times. We will do our best to reschedule canceled appointments and find available times in the upcoming weeks.

As always, feel free to contact our office with any questions or to schedule an appointment. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Sincerely, Eyecare of Austin

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